Friday, September 26, 2014

October 10th Lunch and Learn: Order Out of Chaos




THE CENTER FOR INNOVATION IN TEACHING AND LEARNING PRESENTS


ORDER OUT OF CHAOS:  THINKING BIBLICALLY ABOUT ART< DESIGN< COMPOSITION AND ENGINEERING

Steudler Lounge
October 10, 2014 12-1 pm



In this interactive Lunch and Learn, Christian visual artist Dayton Castleman, who does his large scale sculpture with blow torches and power tools, will discuss the surprisingly close connection between a biblical perspective on art and a biblical perspective on other types of composition, engineering, and design.  Dayton will investigate the ways that humans engaged in processes of design share in God’s creative work that brings order to chaos by dividing, multiplying, and stratifying the material stuff of creation.  Anyone interested in creativity,  engineering, design, building, composition, or a Christian perspective on work in general, will enjoy this lively conversation that will encourage us to think more deeply about the Christian nature of our innovative and creative work.

Dayton Castleman is a multi-modal artist, an educator, and manages the 21c Museum in Bentonville, Arkansas. A New Orleans native, Dayton received his BA in Art from Belhaven University and his MFA in sculpture from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. He has taught as Assistant Professor of Art in sculpture at Trinity Christian College, and as a Museum Educator at Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art. He serves on the city of Bentonville's Public Art Advisory Committee, and the Bentonville Arts District Planning Commission, as well as the board of the Fayetteville Underground gallery. He has lectured and exhibited his artwork in museums and galleries throughout the United States and in Europe.
View his work at:

Thursday, September 25, 2014

October 14th Lunch and Learn




The Center for Innovation in Teaching and Learning (CITL)

Presents

"Camtasia, Snagit and Doceri"



Please join Ms. Lois Knouse as she discusses how she created her robust online Precalculus course using these tools.

October 14, 2015
Steudler Conference Room
12-1 pm

Lunch will be served

Please RSVP to CITL@letu.edu
Please note date of sessions since there are two offerings this month






Monday, August 11, 2014

How many times will I get that email?

In a time when electronic communication spans time and space and our inboxes tend to be overflowing, there are specific things each of us can do to protect the time and space of those we communicate with.

One specific practice we can use is "Bcc" or Blind Carbon Copy. 

I know, I'm old? Why? Because I actually used carbon paper to make copies. It was so cool. You could get a sheet of carbon paper, put it between two pieces of paper and make instant duplicates. Of course, carbon paper hasn't been used in centuries decades. "CC" or "Bcc" in our email systems still refer to this ancient practice of carbon paper. 

When sending an email, we all know what the "To" is for. That's the person you are addressing the email to. "CC" are those you believe should see a copy of the email. When should you use "Bcc"? Many use it to copy in a hidden way a recipient for an FYI. A warning on using "Bcc" to hide a recipient. Many of our mobile devices don't indicate well whether you received an email as a "To", "CC" or "Bcc". Don't trust "Bcc" as a secure way of privately copying a recipient on an email. A better way would be to forward the sent email to the person you want to see a private copy.

So how does "Bcc" help with information overload? If you are sending email to a large group and don't have a tool like Constant Contact or Mail Chimp that sends an individual "To" email to each recipient, you can and should consider using "Bcc". "Bcc" provides you a way to copy a large audience but will prevent all of the recipients on that email from accidentally hitting "Reply to All" and filling everyone's Inbox. Sometimes this can prevent embarrassment as well. It will certainly help with information overload in our email.

We have documented guidelines for sending LETU-Wide communications. Click here to review and happy communicating. 




Thursday, July 24, 2014

DHL Delivery and Wireless AT&T Bills

One of our Administrative Assistants reported something that happened this week. 

She received a call from someone claiming to be from DHL and wanting to know our address and the email for the President. She did not give them the information but asked them to tell her what they already had on file. Then, she asked for a number to call them back. The number she was given was bogus.

As we have the privilege of participating in the story of God's redemption, we live in a world of sin and deceit. From email to phones we are forced to be alert.

Thank you to each of you for continuing to keep alert and help protect God's work here at LETU.

Another LETU Inbox received this very well formed AT&T "scare" bill claiming to owe $1905.47! We saw this in a previous blog entry

As a reminder, and it's a hard one, don't ever click on a web link in an email you receive. For example, if you receive a "bill" like this and you are an AT&T customer, go to the AT&T web site and log in and check your billing. If you aren't an AT&T customer, delete it. 


Thursday, June 26, 2014

Get Safe Online

Several good videos and advice for staying safe online. It's something all of us do as part of our processes in working in this digital world.

http://vimeo.com/98717584

http://vimeo.com/98717583

Thursday, April 17, 2014

April Lunch and Learn Video

April Lunch and Learn Video

 “An Insider’s View of the Journal Publication Process”

Dr. Scott Anson

The video link can be found here:  April 2014 Lunch and Learn

Friday, April 11, 2014

Update on the Heartbleed Bug

We have checked and updated as necessary all of our LETU servers that use OpenSSL to guard against a serious computer bug referred to as the “Heartbleed Bug,” which was discovered by Google Security on Monday, April 7. We are continuing to monitor the situation and will provide additional updated information if any further actions are warranted. OpenSSL is used around the world to provide secure access to web servers.

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